SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the release of the May 26, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda. There are three items in particular that could impact you.

  1. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Non-Represented Airport Police Classes

On May 7, 2021 the City Administrative Officer sent a Report to the City Council entitled “Postponement of Salary Increases For Non-Represented Airport Police Classes – Amendment to Ordinance No. 186937.”

The Report provided in part, “[t]he ordinance submitted…amends Ordinance No. 186937 to provide revised salary increase dates for the non-represented classes of Airport Police Commander (Code 3233), Assistant Airport Police Chief (Code 3234), and Airport Police Chief (Code 3232) to be consistent with the revised dates approved by the City Council for postponing salary increases for the City’s non-represented classes…The revised dates are as follows:

Previous Date             Revised Date

January 31, 2021         June 19, 2022

January 30, 2022         January 29, 2023

June 19, 2022              June 18, 2023.”

Therefore, the Report calls for “the following actions by the City Council and Mayor:

1. That the City Council, subject to the approval of the Mayor, adopt the attached ordinance, approved as to form and legality by the City Attorney, amending Ordinance No. 186937, to postpone previously scheduled salary increases for the non-represented classes of Airport Police Commander (Code 3233), Assistant Airport Police Chief (Code 3234), and Airport Police Chief (Code 3232); and

2. That the City Council authorize the Controller and the City Administrative Officer to correct any clerical errors, or, if approved by the City Attorney, any technical errors in the above ordinance.”

On May 10, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee considered the ordinance. The Committee’s Report stated in part, “[a]fter consideration and having provided an opportunity for public comment, the Committee moved to recommend approval of the recommendations contained in the CAO report. This matter is now submitted to Council for its consideration.”

Now, agenda item 21 of the May 26, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the ordinance. 

2. Workers Who Could be Impacted: City of LA Employees

On May 5, 2021, the Personnel Department sent a Report to the Council entitled “Modification of Prior Council Action Approving a Letter of Agreement Modifying the Special Memorandum of Understanding on Commute Options and Parking – City Employee Parking and Temporary Suspension of Parking Fees.”

The Report provided in part, “[o]n February 23, 2021, the City Council approved an LOA to the City’s Special Memorandum of Understanding on Commute Options and Parking (Special MOU) regarding terms and conditions for temporarily suspending employee parking fees for six pay periods.” This was discussed in a prior post on this site.

The Report went on to state “[t]he LOA applies to all City employees and labor organizations covered by the Special MOU. However, the wording of the action as adopted by the City Council appeared to limit the application of the LOA to only four of the City’s labor organizations, as follows:

February 23, 2021 City Council Action…:

A[pprove] the proposed LOA, attached to the Council file, modifying the Special Memorandum of Understanding on Commute Options and Parking, providing terms and conditions for temporarily suspending employee parking fees for six pay periods with the following entities:

a. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees

b. Laborers’ International Union of North America

c. Los Angeles Police Command Officers Association

d. Service Employees International Union, Local 721

The Personnel Department did not note the inconsistency between the language of the action and the terms and intention of the LOA until after City Council had acted. As a result, in order to provide that the record of the City Council action is fully aligned with the terms and intention of the LOA, the Personnel Department recommends that the City Council, for the record, modify its prior action as follows:

‘Approve a proposed Letter of Agreement (LOA) modifying the Special Memorandum of Understanding on Commute Options and Parking, providing terms and conditions for temporarily suspending employee parking fees for six pay periods.’

Upon modification of the City Council action, the Personnel Department will move immediately to implement the parking fee suspension.”

Therefore, the Report calls for the City Council to “modify its prior action approving a Letter of Agreement (LOA) to the Special Memorandum of Understanding on Commute Options and Parking regarding terms and conditions for temporarily suspending employee parking fees for six pay periods.”

The City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee waived consideration of the Report. 

Now, agenda item 30 of the May 26, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the Report. 

3. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Workers Throughout the City of LA

On April 28, 2021, a Motion was introduced by Councilmember Paul Koretz (5th District) and seconded by six other Councilmembers. The Motion provided in part, “[r]ecently, Governor Newsom announced the goal of fully re-opening the State’s economy by June 15, 2021. While the State has made important strides in getting individuals vaccinated, it is clear that more should be done. High need communities, including essential workers, still face barriers to vaccine access due to a lack of transportation options, work obligations, and disruptions to vaccine deployment. Additionally, many vulnerable residents, especially essential workers, may have already exhausted the existing 80-hour benefit due to either prior infection or exposure to COVID-19, and thus lack the necessary hours to take time off work to get vaccinated. Therefore, the City must take additional actions to further support individuals to complete the vaccination process.”

Therefore, the Motion calls for “the City Council request the Mayor to revise the Emergency Order relative to Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Due to COVID-19 to include provisions to grant all employees employed by private businesses/entities located in the City of Los Angeles, irrespective of the size of their employer, up to an additional four hours of paid leave per injection to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, as well as paid time off for any vaccine related side effects.”

The City Council’s Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment waived consideration of the Motion. 

Now, agenda item 34 of the May 26, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the Motion. 

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the release of the May 18, 2021 Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors meeting agenda and supplemental agenda. There is one item in particular that could impact you.

Workers Who Could be Impacted: Workers Throughout Unincorporated LA County

Agenda item 8: Expanding Vaccine Access through Employee Paid Leave; and 

Agenda item 52: County Code, Title 8 – Consumer Protection, Business and Wage Regulations Amendment

As discussed in a prior post a Motion was introduced at the April 20, 2021 LA County Board of Supervisors that directed “relevant [LA County] Departments, to report back prior to the…Board of Supervisors…with…Proposed Urgency Ordinance language that…[g]rants all employees in private businesses/entities located in the unincorporated areas of the County up to an additional four hours of excused paid leave per injection to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.”

At the May 18, 2021 meeting, a Motion will be introduced by Chair Hilda Solis (1st District) and Supervisor Sheila Kuehl (3rd District). The Motion provides in part, “[i]n workplaces across the County, many employees lack the financial means to take the necessary time off from work to access the vaccine. This is especially true for low wage and essential workers…It is clear that more must be done to remove barriers to access for workers across the County, especially our essential workers…workers must not be forced to decide between a paycheck and taking the necessary steps to safeguard their own wellbeing and the public health. To that end, it is critical that all workers have access to additional paid leave benefits to get vaccinated.”

Therefore, the Motion calls for “the Board of Supervisors approve the attached urgency Ordinance to add Chapter 8.205 (Employee Paid Leave for Expanded Vaccine Access) to Division 5 – (COVID-19 Worker Protections) of Title 8 – (Consumer Protection, Business and Wage Regulations) of the Los Angeles County Municipal Code, to establish paid leave for employees in unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.”

According to the Ordinance Analysis prepared by the County Counsel, the ordinance “require[s] private employers in the unincorporated areas of the County to provide paid leave for employees to receive COVID-19 vaccine injections…This ordinance is an urgency measure that will take immediate effect upon its approval by at least a four-fifths vote of the Board of Supervisors.”

Now, agenda items 8 and 52 of the May 18, 2021 Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors meeting calls for the Board to consider the Ordinance.

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come ahead of the May 1, 2021 legalization of public sector collective bargaining in Virginia.

Workers Who Could be Impacted: Public Sector Workers Throughout Virginia

In 1977, the Supreme Court of Virginia ruled in Commonwealth of Virginia v. County Board of Arlington County, Et al. that public employee bargaining was impermissible absent express statutory authority. In 1993, the Virginia General Assembly codified this ruling. 

The 1993 law, chaptered as Code of Virginia Table Title 40.1 Chapter 4 Article 2.1 § 40.1-57.2. states, “[n]o state, county, municipal, or like governmental officer, agent or governing body is vested with or possesses any authority to recognize any labor union or other employee association as a bargaining agent of any public officers or employees, or to collectively bargain or enter into any collective bargaining contract with any such union or association or its agents with respect to any matter relating to them or their employment or service.”

On April 22, 2020, the Virginia General Assembly passed SB 939 and its sister bill HB 582. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam then signed both bills into law. The bills replace the language in Title 40.1 Chapter 4 Article 2.1 § 40.1-57.2 to allow counties, cites, or towns in Virginia to grant authority to recognize a labor union or other employee association as a bargaining agent of public officers or employees, and to collectively bargain with such a union or association.

The new text of Title 40.1 Chapter 4 Article 2.1 § 40.1-57.2, effective May 1, 2021, provides, 

“A. No state, county, city, town, or like governmental officer, agent, or governing body is vested with or possesses any authority to recognize any labor union or other employee association as a bargaining agent of any public officers or employees, or to collectively bargain or enter into any collective bargaining contract with any such union or association or its agents with respect to any matter relating to them or their employment or service unless, in the case of a county, city, or town, such authority is provided for or permitted by a local ordinance or by a resolution. Any such ordinance or resolution shall provide for procedures for the certification and decertification of exclusive bargaining representatives, including reasonable public notice and opportunity for labor organizations to intervene in the process for designating an exclusive representative of a bargaining unit. As used in this section, ‘county, city, or town’ includes any local school board, and “public officers or employees” includes employees of a local school board.

B. No ordinance or resolution adopted pursuant to subsection A shall include provisions that restrict the governing body’s authority to establish the budget or appropriate funds.

C. For any governing body of a county, city, or town that has not adopted an ordinance or resolution providing for collective bargaining, such governing body shall, within 120 days of receiving certification from a majority of public employees in a unit considered by such employees to be appropriate for the purposes of collective bargaining, take a vote to adopt or not adopt an ordinance or resolution to provide for collective bargaining by such public employees and any other public employees deemed appropriate by the governing body. Nothing in this subsection shall require any governing body to adopt an ordinance or resolution authorizing collective bargaining.

D. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection A regarding a local ordinance or resolution granting or permitting collective bargaining, no officer elected pursuant to Article VII, Section 4 of the Constitution of Virginia or any employee of such officer is vested with or possesses any authority to recognize any labor union or other employee association as a bargaining agent of any public officers or employees, or to collectively bargain or enter into any collective bargaining contract with any such union or association or its agents, with respect to any matter relating to them or their employment or service.”

On April 17, 2021, the City of Alexandria, Virginia adopted such an ordinance to “establish collective bargaining between the City and certain City employees.” 

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the release of the April 20, 2021 Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors meeting agenda and supplemental agenda. There is one item in particular that could impact you.

Workers Who Could be Impacted: Workers Throughout Unincorporated LA County

Supplemental Agenda Item 43-G “Employee Paid Leave for Expanded Vaccine Access”

A Motion will be introduced by Chair Hilda Solis (1st District) and Supervisor Sheila Kuehl (3rd District). The Motion provides in part, “As eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine expands and supplies coming into Los Angeles County increase, it is critical that barriers to vaccine access are removed to ensure an effective and equitable response… In workplaces across the County, many employees lack the financial means to take the necessary time off from work to access the vaccine. This is especially true for low wage and essential workers…It is clear that more must be done to remove barriers to access for workers across the County, especially our essential workers.

Opportunities for vaccines to come to workplaces must expand, but workers must also have a greater ability to access vaccination sites. Furthermore, workers must not be forced to decide between a paycheck and taking the necessary steps to safeguard their own wellbeing and the public health. To that end, it is critical that all workers have access to additional paid leave benefits to get vaccinated…

California law, SB 95…requir[es] all employers with 25 or more employees to provide 80 hours of COVID-19 related sick leave for full-time employees, and for part-time employees, hours to cover the normal schedule that employee would work over two weeks. Though this covers vaccine-related time, many of our most vulnerable residents, especially our essential workers, may have already exhausted the existing 80-hour benefit due to either prior infection or exposure to COVID-19, and thus lack the necessary hours to take time off work to get vaccinated. To that end, it is important that workers be provided additional paid leave receive their vaccine…”

Therefore, the Motion calls for “the Board of Supervisors [to] direct County Counsel, in consultation with relevant Departments, to report back prior to the May 4, 2021 Board of Supervisors meeting with the following: 

1. Proposed Urgency Ordinance language that: 

a. Grants all employees in private businesses/entities located in the unincorporated areas of the County up to an additional four hours of excused paid leave per injection to receive the COVID-19 vaccine; 

b. Ensures that the leave of absence is granted at the employee’s regular rate of pay and shall not be charged against any other leave an employee is entitled to, including paid sick leave; 

c. Provides up to four hours of retroactive pay per injection for employees who received the vaccine during work time since January 1, 2021; 

d. Prohibits retaliatory action against any employee who exercises rights afforded under this proposed ordinance; and 

e. Submit the recommended Urgency Ordinance for Board consideration within 14 days. 

2. A memorandum that advises the Board as to whether such an Urgency Ordinance can apply to all private employees in the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County.”

Now, agenda item 43-G of the April 20, 2021 Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors meeting calls for the Board to consider the Motion. 

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following Governor Gavin Newsom’s signing of Senate Bill (SB) 93.

Workers Who Could be Impacted: Workers Throughout California in the Hospitality and Business Services Industries, Including Hotels, Airports, and Large Event Centers

On December 16, 2020, SB 93, entitled “Employment: rehiring and retention: displaced workers: COVID-19 pandemic” was introduced in the California State Senate by its lead authors, the Senate Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review.

The Legislative Counsel’s Digest of SB 93 provides in part, “[t]his bill would, until December 31, 2024, require an employer…to offer its laid-off employees specified information about job positions that become available for which the laid-off employees are qualified, and to offer positions to those laid-off employees based on a preference system…The bill would define the term ‘laid-off employee’ to mean any employee who was employed by the employer for 6 months or more in the 12 months preceding January 1, 2020, and whose most recent separation from active service was due to a reason related to the COVID-19 pandemic, including a public health directive, government shutdown order, lack of business, a reduction in force, or other economic, nondisciplinary reason related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The bill would require an employer to keep records for 3 years, including records of communications regarding the offers. The bill would require an employer that declines to recall a laid-off employee on the grounds of lack of qualifications and instead hires someone other than a laid-off employee to provide the laid-off employee a written notice within 30 days including specified reasons for the decision, and other information on those hired.

This bill would, until December 31, 2024, prohibit an employer from refusing to employ, terminating, reducing compensation, or taking other adverse action against any laid-off employee for seeking to enforce their rights under these provisions. The bill would establish specified methods by which these provisions may be enforced, including authorizing an employee to file a complaint with the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement against the employer for specified relief, including hiring and reinstatement rights and awarding of back pay, as well as a civil penalty. The bill would authorize the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations, and issue determinations and interpretations concerning these provisions…

This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately…”

On January 21, 2021 SB 93 passed the California State Senate. On April 12, 2012 SB 93 passed the California State Assembly. On April 15, 2021 the Senate concurred with the Assembly’s amendments, and the Bill was presented to the Governor. 

On April 16, 2021 Governor Gavin Newsom signed SB 93 into law and it took immediate effect. 

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the release of the April 14, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda. There are three items in particular that could impact you.

1. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Unrepresented City of LA Employees

On February 10, 2021 the City Administrative Officer (CAO) sent a Report to the City Council entitled “Los Angeles Administrative Code Amendment to Add Additional Unpaid Holidays For Non-Represented Employees In FY 2020-21.” 

The Report provided in part “[o]n February 9, 2021, the Los Angeles City Council adopted amended memoranda of understanding (MOUs) for most of the civilian workforce. Those amended MOUs provide for two (2) unpaid days, in addition the two adopted by Council in October 2020…The…amendment will allow the same two (2) additional unpaid days for non-represented employees. The amended MOUs also include a provision for up to 40 hours of personal leave for each employee. This provision will require amending a different section of the Administrative Code and will be transmitted with separate ordinance at a later date.”

Therefore, the Report recommended that the “City Council, subject to approval by the Mayor: 1. Adopt the attached ordinance, approved as to form and legality by the City Attorney, amending Section 4.120 of the Los Angeles Administrative Code, to add two (2) additional unpaid holidays for non-represented employees during Fiscal Year 2020-21. [and] 2. Authorize the Controller and the City Administrative Officer to correct any clerical errors, or, if approved by the City Attorney, any technical errors in the above ordinance.”

On March 3, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee (PAAW) considered the Ordinance. The Committee’s Report provided in part “[a]fter consideration and having provided an opportunity for public comment, the PAAW Committee moved to recommend approval of the recommendations contained in the CAO report and detailed in the…recommendations. Subsequently, on March 22, 2021, the Budget and Finance Committee also considered this matter and after also having provided an opportunity for public comment, moved to concur with the PAAW Committee. This matter is now submitted to Council for its consideration.” The Committees’ recommendation was for the unpaid holidays “to be taken no later than June 19, 2021.”

Now, agenda item 10 of the April 14, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the Ordinance. 

2. Workers Who Could be Impacted: United Firefighters of Los Angeles City (UFLAC) Firefighters and Fire Captains Bargaining Unit (MOU 23)

On April 1, 2021, the City Administrative Officer (CAO) sent a Report to the City Council entitled “2019-2022 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the United Firefighters of Los Angeles City (UFLAC) – MOU 23.”

The Report provided in part “[i]n accordance with the instructions of the Executive Employee Relations Committee (EERC), a tentative agreement has been reached with the United Firefighters of Los Angeles City (UFLAC) for the Firefighters and Fire Captains representation bargaining unit for an amended MOU. The tentative agreement has been ratified by bargaining unit members. The key provisions of the agreement are as follows:

Term & Salary

Extend term from 3 years to 5 years (July 1, 2019 – June 29, 2024).

Defer last base wage increase of 4.5% from July 4, 2021, to January 1, 2023.

Time Off for Union Representatives

Allow for members on full time release to retain bonuses.

Allow for members on full time release to earn credit for union release time relative to the calculation of overtime. 

Require UFLAC to reimburse the City for full time release at the end of the MOU term.

Extend existing Letter of Agreement regarding Representative Lima to reflect the 2024 MOU term expiration year.

Expand release coverage to include Executive Board of California Professional Firefighters (CPF) and one unit member appointed to a staff/executive position on either International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) or CPF.

Budget and Finances

New Letter of Agreement requiring meetings to provide periodic updates on the City’s budget and finances; UFLAC can invoke right to meet and confer over distribution of significant state/federal relief money received by the City.

Health Insurance

In January 2022 and January 2023 the parties shall meet and confer to establish the monthly subsidy amounts for the corresponding upcoming fiscal years (July 2022 and July 2023).

Modified Coverage

New Letter of Agreement ensuring ‘No Brown Outs’ and the formation of a Joint Labor Management Committee to discuss daily closure methodology.

Retirement Incentive Pay

New Letter of Agreement that covers members who plan on entering DROP or retiring between July 4, 2021, and December 31, 2022, for purposes of including active compensation (highest 12 months) regarding retirement allowance calculation.

Allow members who entered DROP prior to July 4, 2021, to take advantage of Retirement Incentive Pay during the last pay period of employment to maintain deferred salary regarding accumulated time off payouts.”

Therefore, the Report recommended “that the City Council: 1. Approve the…2019-2024 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Bargaining Unit 23; and 2. Authorize the Controller and the CAO to correct any clerical errors or make necessary technical corrections subsequent to City Council approval.”

On April 7, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee waived consideration of the amended MOU.

Now, agenda item 37 of the April 14, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the amended MOU.

3. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Fire Chief Officers Representation Unit (MOU 22)

On April 6, 2021, the City Administrative Officer (CAO) sent a Report to the City Council entitled “2019-2022 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Officers Association (MOU 22).”

The Report provided in part “[i]n accordance with the instructions of the Executive Employee Relations Committee (EERC), a tentative agreement has been reached with the Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Officers Association for the Fire Chief Officers representation bargaining unit for an amended MOU. The tentative agreement has been ratified by bargaining unit members. The key provisions of the agreement are as follows: 

Term & Salary

Extend term from 3 years to 5 years (July 1, 2019 – June 29, 2024).

Defer the last base wage increase of 4.5% from July 4, 2021, to January 1, 2023.

Budget and Finances

New Letter of Agreement requiring meetings to provide periodic updates on the City’s budget and finances; the Association can invoke right to meet and confer over distribution of significant state/federal relief money received by the City. 

Health Insurance

In January 2022 and January 2023 the parties shall meet and confer to establish the monthly subsidy amounts for the corresponding upcoming fiscal years (July 2022 and July 2023).     

Modified Coverage

New Letter of Agreement ensuring ‘No Brown Outs’ and the formation of a Joint Labor Management Committee to discuss daily closure methodology.

Retirement Incentive Pay

New Letter of Agreement that covers members who plan on entering DROP or retiring between July 4, 2021, and December 31, 2022, for purposes of including active compensation (highest 12 months) regarding retirement allowance calculation.

Allows members who entered DROP prior to July 4, 2021, to take advantage of Retirement Incentive Pay during the last pay period of employment to maintain deferred salary regarding accumulated time off payouts.”

Therefore, the Report recommended “that the City Council: 1. Approve the…2019-2024 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Bargaining Unit 22; and 2. Authorize the Controller and the CAO to correct any clerical errors or make necessary technical corrections subsequent to City Council approval.”

On April 7, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee waived consideration of the amended MOU.

Now, agenda item 38 of the April 14, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the amended MOU.

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the April 9, 20021 release of results in the Amazon Union representation election.

According to the NLRB, there were approximately 3,041 employees of Amazon’s facility in Bessemer, Alabama who “mailed in ballots indicating whether they want to be represented by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union” (RWDSU). 

Of the 5,876 eligible voters, 738 votes were cast in favor of representation by the RWDSU, and 1,798 votes were cast against representation by the RWDSU. 76 ballots were void, and 505 ballots were challenged. As such, “[c]hallenges are not sufficient in number to affect the results of the election.” Therefore, a “majority of the valid votes counted plus challenged ballots has not been cast for” representation by the RWDSU. “The parties have five business days to file objections contesting the conduct or results of the election.”

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the release of the April 6, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda. There is one item in particular that could impact you.

Workers Who Could be Impacted: Non-Represented City of LA Employees

On March 2, 2021, the City Administrative Officer (CAO) sent a Report to the City Council entitled “Establishment of Personal Leave for Non-Represented Employees Ordinance Adding Los Angeles Administrative Code Section 4.130.”

The Report provided in part “[i]n accordance with instructions from the Executive Employee Relations Committee, an ordinance is submitted herein to provide a personal leave benefit for non-represented employees consistent with the personal leave benefit provided to represented employees in the City’s civilian memoranda of understanding. The personal leave benefit affords full-time employees 40 hours of compensated time per calendar year to use for an event requiring an employee’s immediate attention. Half-time and intermittent employees will be entitled to a pro-rated number of hours of personal leave based on their hours worked in the prior calendar year. Unused personal leave cannot be carried over to subsequent calendar years or cashed out upon separation from City service.”

Therefore, the Report recommended “1. That the City Council, subject to the approval of the Mayor, adopt the attached ordinance…amending the Los Angeles Administrative Code to add a new Section 4.130 to provide a personal leave benefit for non-represented employees; and 2. That the City Council authorize the Controller and the City Administrative Officer to correct any clerical errors, or, if approved by the City Attorney, any technical errors in the above ordinance.”

On March 1, 2021, the City Attorney sent a Report to the City Council entitled “Draft Ordinance Adding Section 4.130 to the Los Angeles Administrative Code to Provide a Personal Leave Benefit for Non-Represented Employees Effective February 28, 2021.” The Report provided in part “[t]his Office has prepared…the…draft ordinance…The draft ordinance would add Section 4.130 to Article 10, Chapter 2 of Division 4 of the Los Angeles Administrative Code to provide a personal leave benefit for non-represented employees effective February 28, 2021.”

On March 17, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee approved the Draft Ordinance.

Now, agenda item 14 of the April 6, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the Draft Ordinance.

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the release of the March 31, 2021 Los Angeles City Council special meeting agenda. There are two items in particular that could impact you.

1. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Crossing Guards Bargaining Unit (MOU 34)

On March 1, 2021, the City Administrative Officer (CAO) sent a Report to the City Council entitled “2018-2022 Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Amendment for the California Teamsters Public, Professional and Medical Employees Union (Teamsters) – MOU 34.”

The Report provided in part “[i]n accordance with Executive Employee Relations Committee instructions, agreement has been reached with Teamsters, Crossing Guards bargaining unit principally consistent with the agreements reached by the other bargaining units in the Coalition of Los Angeles City Unions (Coalition). This bargaining is completely comprised of part-time staff exclusively employed at the Department of Transportation as Crossing Guards.

The MOU has been ratified by the membership and is attached for your consideration and approval. The amended MOU includes an 18-month extension of the expiration date from June 30, 2021, to December 31, 2022.

 The key provisions are…:

Term – July 1, 2018, through December 31, 2022.

Furloughs – No furloughs will be implemented during Fiscal Year 2020/2021. Further, the parties agree to meet and confer on furloughs before implementation of furloughs in any other years during the term of this MOU.

Layoffs – No layoffs will be implemented during Fiscal Year 2020/2021.

Unpaid Days – Two (2) unpaid days in Fiscal Year 2020/2021.

Personal Leave – Effective February 28, 2021, each unit member shall, in addition to all other compensatory time, receive up to 40 hours per calendar year as personal leave.

Salary Reopener – Parties agree to reopen on salaries only no earlier than January 1, 2022.”

Therefore, the Report recommended “that the City Council: 

1. Approve the attached 2018-2022 MOU 34, Crossing Guards bargaining unit, Local 911; and

2. Authorize the Controller and the CAO to correct any clerical errors in the MOU or make necessary technical corrections, subsequent to City Council approval.”

On March 17, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, And Animal Welfare Committee considered the Amended MOU. The Committee’s Report provided in part “[a]fter consideration and having provided an opportunity for public comment, the Committee moved to recommend approval of the recommendations contained in the CAO report…This matter is now submitted…for its consideration.”

Now, agenda item 1 of the March 31, 2021 Los Angeles City Council special meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the Amended MOU.

2. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Inspectors Bargaining Unit (MOU 5)

On March 1, 2021, the the City Administrative Officer (CAO) sent a Report to the City Council entitled “2019-2023 Amendment to Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) For The Municipal Construction Inspectors Association (MOU 5).”

The Report provide in part “[i]n accordance with Executive Employee Relations Committee instructions, agreement has been reached with the Municipal Construction Inspectors Association (MCIA) for an extension to the 2019-2022 for MOU 5. The MOU was ratified by the bargaining unit members and is attached for your approval. 

The attached MOU includes an 18 month extension of the expiration date from June 30, 2022 to December 31, 2023. In addition to the key provisions listed below, the MOU includes modified provisions related to operations consistent with other bargaining units.”

The key provisions include:

“Term – June 23, 2019, through December 31, 2023.

Salary Deferrals – The 2% salary adjustment scheduled for July 4, 2021, shall be deferred to July 3, 2022. -The 2% salary adjustment scheduled for June 19, 2022, shall be deferred to January 29, 2023.

Unpaid Days – In addition to the two previously agreed upon unpaid days (November 3, 2020 and April 2, 2021), two (2) additional unpaid days in Fiscal Year 2020/2021.

Furloughs – No furloughs will be implemented during Fiscal Year 2020/2021. Further, the parties agree to meet and confer on furloughs before implementation of furloughs in any other years during the term of this MOU. 

Layoffs – No layoffs will be implemented during Fiscal Year 2020/2021. 

Salary Reopener – Parties agree to reopen on salaries only no earlier than January 1, 2022.

Personal Leave – Effective February 28, 2021, each member shall, in addition to the current 16 hours provided, receive an additional 24 hours of personal leave for a total of 40 hours per calendar year. 

Career Development – Each member[] shall receive sixteen (16) hours of compensatory time off per year in calendar years 2021 and 2022 only, for the purpose of outside career development subject to course approval.”

Therefore, the Report recommended “that the City Council: 

1. Approve the attached 2019-2023 MOU for MCIA – MOU 5; and 

2. Authorize the Controller and the CAO to correct any clerical errors in the MOU, or make necessary technical corrections subsequent to City Council approval.”

On March 17, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, And Animal Welfare Committee considered the Amended MOU. The Committee’s Report provided in part “[a]fter consideration and having provided an opportunity for public comment, the Committee moved to recommend approval of the recommendations contained in the CAO report and detailed in in the above recommendations. This matter is now submitted…for its consideration.”

Now, agenda item 2 of the March 31, 2021 Los Angeles City Council special meeting agenda calls for the Council to consider the Amended MOU.

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC

SR Holguin, PC is a union-side labor and employment law firm with nearly four decades of experience representing private sector unions, public sector unions, and multi-employer trust funds. SR Holguin, PC is committed to providing full-service legal representation to each of our clients.

One way in which SR Holguin, PC ensures our clients and their members stay informed is by keeping you updated on recent developments relating to workers’ rights. Today’s updates come following the release of the March 23, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting revised agenda. There are two items in particular that could impact you.

1. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Los Angeles Police Protective League (LAPPL) – MOU 24

On March 1, 2021, the City Administrative Officer sent a Report to the City Council entitled “2019-2022 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the Los Angeles Police Protective League (LAPPL) – MOU 24.” 

The Report provided in part “[i]n accordance with the instructions of the Executive Employee Relations Committee (EERC), a tentative agreement has been reached with the Los Angeles Police Protective League (LAPPL) for the Police Officers, Lieutenant and Below representation bargaining unit for an amended MOU. The tentative agreement has been ratified by bargaining unit members.

The key provisions of the agreement are as follows:

Term & Salary

Extend term from 3 years to 5 years (July 1, 2019 – June 29, 2024).

Defer date of base wage increase of 3% from January 16, 2022, to January 1, 2023.

Defer date of base wage increase of 1.5% from June 19, 2022, to January 1, 2023.

Budget and Finances

New Letter of Agreement requiring meetings to provide periodic updates on the City’s budget and finances; LAPPL can invoke right to meet and confer over distribution of significant state/federal relief money received by the City.

Allocate and pay a minimum of $70 million in cash overtime in FY 2021/2022, 2022/2023, and 2023/2024.

Establish an overtime bank “buy-back” program in mid-to-late FY 2022/23 to be administered in FY 2023/24 for a minimum of $35 million subject to budget conditions.

Continue the overtime bank “buy-back” program in the existing LOA to 2022/23.

Health Insurance

In January 2022 and January 2023 the parties shall meet and confer to establish the monthly subsidy amounts for the corresponding upcoming fiscal years (July 2022 and July 2023).

No Lay Offs

Provides that no layoffs will occur during FY 2020/21.

Retirement Incentive Pay

Provides members who plan on entering [the Deferred Retirement Option Plan (DROP)] or retiring between January 16, 2022, and December 31, 2022, for purposes of including active compensation (highest 12 months) regarding retirement allowance calculation.

Allows members in DROP prior to January 16, 2022, to take advantage of Retirement Incentive Pay during the last pay period of employment to maintain deferred salary regarding accumulated time off payouts.”

Therefore, the Report “recommends that the City Council:

1. Approve the attached 2019-2024 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Bargaining Unit 24; and

2. Authorize the Controller and the CAO to correct any clerical errors or make necessary technical corrections subsequent to City Council approval.”

On March 17, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee considered and approved the Report.

Now, agenda item 19 of the March 23, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting calls for the Council to consider the Report.

2. Workers Who Could be Impacted: Los Angeles Police Command Officers Association (MOU 25)

On March 8, 2021 the City Administrative Officer sent a Report to the City Council entitled “2019-2022 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the Los Angeles Police Command Officers Association (MOU 25).”

The Report provided in part “[i]n accordance with the instructions of the Executive Employee Relations Committee (EERC), a tentative agreement has been reached with the Los Angeles Police Command Officers Association (LAPCOA) for the Police Officers, Captain and Above representation bargaining unit for an amended MOU. The tentative agreement has been ratified by bargaining unit members.”

The key provisions of the agreement are as follows:

Term & Salary

Extend term from 3 years to 5 years (July 1, 2019 – June 29, 2024).

Defer date of base wage increase of 3% from January 16, 2022, to January 1, 2023.

Health Insurance

In January 2022 and January 2023 the parties shall meet and confer to establish the monthly subsidy amounts for the next fiscal year (July 2022 and July 2023).

Budget and Finances

New Letter of Agreement requiring meetings to provide periodic updates on the City’s budget and finances; LAPCOA can invoke right to meet and confer over distribution of significant state/federal relief money received by the City.

Retirement Incentive Pay

Provides members who plan on entering DROP or retiring between January 16, 2022, and December 31, 2022, for purposes of including active compensation (highest 12 months) regarding retirement allowance calculation.

Allows members in DROP prior to January 16, 2022, to take advantage of Retirement Incentive Pay during the last pay period of employment to maintain deferred salary regarding accumulated time off payouts.”

Therefore, the Report “recommends that the City Council: 

1. Approve the attached 2019-2022 Amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Bargaining Unit 25; and

2. Authorize the Controller and the CAO to correct any clerical errors or make

necessary technical corrections subsequent to City Council approval.”

On March 17, 2021, the City Council’s Personnel, Audits, and Animal Welfare Committee considered and approved the Report.

Now, agenda item 20 of the March 23, 2021 Los Angeles City Council meeting calls for the Council to consider the Report.

We hope these updates are helpful to you.

Fraternally,

SR Holguin, PC